MCAD’s BAM Sparks Interest in Architecture in African-American Students

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Of the 105,000 registered architects in the U.S., less than two percent are African Americans. In an effort to increase their representation in the industry, architect Craig Aquart of M.C. Harry and Associates created Black Architects in the Making.

BAM is a hands-on educational workshop focused on educating students, primarily African-American, on the architectural profession, and is supported by the Miami Center for Architecture and Design and the American Institute of Architects Miami chapter.

The definition of an architect is “a person who designs buildings and advises in their construction.”

So, it makes sense that the American Institute of Architects Miami Chapter would help build a program that focuses on educating middle and high school students, primarily African American, on the architecture profession.

The U.S. has produced very few African-American architects. According to the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards, of the 109,748 registered architects in a 2016 survey, only 2 percent are African Americans.

In an effort to increase that representation, Miami architect Craig Aquart of M C Harry & Associates created Black Architects in the Making to join the already established Architects in the Making program. The American Institute of Architects Miami Chapter supports both.

“BAM is a seed planting program that we must continue in more communities to diversify the architectural profession,” Aquart said in an email. “Students who knew little or nothing about architecture and the role it plays in their communities, now understand that their involvement in building better communities is essential to their well-being.”

Since its inception in 2015, Black Architects in the Making has designed more than 21 workshops led by African-American professionals. The efforts have reached over 300 students in Overtown, Liberty City, Richmond Heights and Homestead.

To read the full story, visit the Miami Herald.

PCCSF’s Dr. Greissman Discusses Meningitis with HealthyWay

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What may seem as a normal cold or flu could instead be the potentially life-threatening infection, meningitis. Because it’s important to act quickly, patients should understand the telltale signs of meningitis and take the appropriate medical action. Dr. Allan Greissman of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida shared with HealthyWay what symptoms patients should look out for.

Everyone gets sick from time to time. But sometimes, what we think of as a normal cold or flu might actually be far more dangerous. With flu season fast approaching, it’s important to understand and recognize the difference between normal illness and more serious conditions.

If flu-like symptoms come on and escalate quickly, it may mean you or a loved one has actually contracted meningitis. Meningitis is an infection that causes our meninges—the membranes that provide a protective barrier for the brain and spinal cord—to swell.

Meningitis is a serious condition that requires immediate attention from a medical professional. It can be life-threatening if left untreated, so it is important to understand the telltale symptoms. When you can spot symptoms early on, you can quickly seek out medical attention that can mitigate the negative effects of the disease.

Understanding the Types of Meningitis

There are a few different types of meningitis, but bacterial and viral meningitis are the two most common.

Bacterial meningitis is the most severe form of meningitis and can be fatal, especially if treatment is delayed. There are many types of bacteria that can cause meningitis, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Group B Streptococcus, and Listeria monocytogenes.

Thankfully, the introduction of and increased access to safe and effective vaccines resulted in a steady decrease in bacterial meningitis cases since the 1990s. However, cases that do occur are dangerous and can be fatal if left untreated.

Bacterial meningitis is treated with oral or IV antibiotics, and treatment can last between 10 and 21 days, according to Allan Greissman, MD, of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida.

The second most commonly experienced meningitis is viral meningitis. Although there is no vaccine for viral meningitis, you can be vaccinated against some of the viruses that could cause meningitis, like measles, mumps, or influenza.

It helps to think of viral meningitis as a potential complication of these other viruses. This means that, although you might catch measles, mumps, or the flu from someone with viral meningitis, that doesn’t necessarily mean you will also develop viral meningitis.

“Viral meningitis will run its course and should not [be], and is not, treated with IV antibiotics,” says Greissman. He notes that one exception is a form of viral meningitis caused by the herpes viruses, which is treated with an antiviral medication.

To read the full story, visit Healthy Way.

CORE Design + Build Brings Luxury Modern Architecture to the Mid-Atlantic

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Miami-based architecture firm, Choeff Levy Fischman, is taking its talents to the Mid-Atlantic with the collaboration of a new partnership with Maryland-based builder, Aaron Feivelson. The new venture, known as CORE Design + Build combines Choeff Levy Fischman’s award-winning, tailored environmental designs with Feivelson’s premier experiential home building services.

If Greater Baltimore is going to attract big money talent, the region needs to deliver on the kind of lifestyle many of those individuals look for.

For Aaron Feivelson, that lifestyle begins quite literally at home.

Feivelson has launched a new company in partnership with a Miami architecture firm to bring a new, modern style of high-end home design to the mid-Atlantic.

While the Baltimore area does have its share of luxury mansions and homes, they are overwhelmingly in the traditional style, Feivelson said. And there aren’t many examples of good modern design in the area, he said.

The firm, CORE Design + Build, specializes in an architectural style known as environmental modern, a sleek look focused on natural materials, sharp lines and open spaces. This type of home is made for a more forward-thinking client, one that is looking not only for a place to live, but a place that also serves as a work of art.

CORE is a collaboration between Feivelson, who is also president of homebuilding firm Sunfire Homes in Stevenson, and Ralph Choeff, founding principal of Choeff Levy Fischman Architecture + Design in Miami. The idea for environmental modern stems from the tropical modern style, which Choeff is well-known for.

To read the full story, visit the Baltimore Business Journal.

Stambul Acquires the Historic Walgreens Building in Downtown Miami

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Stambul, a family-owned and operated, full-service boutique construction and development firm, finalized the purchase of the historic Walgreens building in Downtown Miami for $19.75 million. Located at 200 East Flagler St., the building was owned by the Alonso family and was once home to La Epoca Department Store. Stambul plans to transform the approximately 50,000 sq. ft. building into a multi-level entertainment complex, which will serve as a catalyst for Downtown Miami’s resurgence.

The iconic Walgreens building at 200 E. Flagler St. in downtown Miami has a new owner with big plans for the future of the historic property.

The Miami-based construction and development firm Stambul paid $19.75 million for the 50,000 square-foot building. The sale closed on Friday.

The building was put up for sale in June 2016 by the Alonso family, who owned the department store La Epoca that had operated out of the location since 2005. The store closed in November 2016.

The five-story building, which was entered into the National Register of Historic Places in 1988 and cannot be torn down, will be turned into a multi-level collection of high-end restaurants, retail and entertainment venues.

“We are meticulously and thoughtfully curating and overseeing vendors, spaces and activities that will integrate to provide an organic experience,” Stambul’s Principal Daniel Peña Giraldi said in a press release. “Stambul wants to be a key player in the rebirth of Downtown Miami and its evolution into a culinary and entertainment destination for locals and tourists.

To read more, visit The Miami Herald.

Construction at SoLē Mia Picks Up

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Construction is rapidly picking up at SoLē Mia – a community that will rise at 15045 Biscayne Boulevard. As the largest project in North Miami’s history, SoLē Mia is set to become South Florida’s next iconic neighborhood blending the serenity of open spaces with the vibrancy of an urban center.

Construction on the site went vertical at the end of 2017 with SoLē Mia’s first two residential towers and the Warren Henry Automobile Dealership consisting of Land Rover, Jaguar and Infiniti. The site’s Costco is quickly moving along and will be a tenant of The Shops at SoLē Mia. The development will reshape the North Miami landscape and transform the area into an exciting destination for guests and residents. When completed, SoLē Mia Miami will feature 4,390 residences, approximately 500,000 square feet of lifestyle shopping, emerald green community parks, chef-driven restaurants, entertainment venues and office spaces.

With construction on the SoLē Mia site pushing forward, SoLē Mia’s Local Preference Office is offering City of North Miami residents short- and long-term job opportunities in various construction trades.

Stantec Breaks Ground on Atelier in the Dallas Arts District

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Global architecture and design firm Stantec has broken ground on Atelier, the 41-story residential building located in the heart of the Dallas Arts District. Atelier, which means “artist workshop”, is designed to support the District’s local artists and residents with an appreciation for the arts and urban living.

The mixed-use high-rise will feature 364 luxury residential units and 52 mixed-income artist’s lofts that include 43 affordable artist residences. The project also includes an amenity deck with a pool, 15,000 square-feet of retail and gallery and exhibit space.

“Atelier is being built on the idea of patronage. The building’s modern design will integrate with its neighboring performing and visual arts venues, while also supporting local artists, residents and community members who share a common need to create beauty,” said Andrew Burnett, principal at Stantec’s Miami office, which is leading the architecture and interior design of Atelier.

After years of waiting, developers are set to break ground today on Atelier, which in its most recent incarnation is a 41-story luxury high‐rise in the Dallas Arts District.

The mixed‐use development, which is marketing itself as the tallest rental tower in the Dallas area, will be comprised of 364 residential tower units with sweeping views of Uptown and downtown Dallas.

The project between the Nasher Sculpture Center and the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center will have over 26,000 square feet of amenity space and 15,000 square feet of onsite retail.

Atelier is also planned to be home to Flora Lofts, 52 affordable artist lofts developed by DFW architect Graham Greene.

In addition, there will be 157 hourly‐fee public parking spaces in the underground structure and 553 resident spaces in a 10‐story parking garage.

Orlando-based multifamily developer Zom Living is developing Atelier in partnership with affiliates of Daiwa House Texas Inc. and Itochu Corp.

To read more, visit The Dallas Business Journal.

Jalal Farooq on Preparing for 2018 Hurricane Season

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Twice a year, the Miami Herald enlists new members for its CEO Roundtable. Jalal Farooq, principal and leader of Al-Farooq Corporation’s team of engineers, was chosen among select executives at small, large and nonprofit businesses. Farooq earned his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Florida International University and graduated from Stanford University with a master’s degree in structural engineering and geomechanics. Each week, Miami Herald asks its CEO Roundtable a question about a topic of interest to South Floridians.

As South Florida gets ready for what’s expected to be another active hurricane season, Jalal Farooq tells the Miami Herald how he’s preparing his business and what South Florida should be aware of on Miami Herald’s CEO Roundtable.

“As a business, the most important thing to make sure is that our data is secure, and we’ve done that,” says Jalal Farooq, principal and senior project engineer at Al-Farooq Corporation. “We specialize in engineering for impact-resistant windows, doors and building envelopes, and I would remind everyone that South Florida has the toughest hurricane codes in the country. With that in mind, if I were in an older building, I would have it checked out by a structural engineer.”

Al-Farooq Corporation has completed more than 15,000 projects around the country and is considered #1 in product approvals in South Florida. In business for more than 35 years, the Miami-based engineering firm is responsible for more than 50% of all Notice of Acceptance (NOA’s) in South Florida.

To read more, visit Miami Herald.

How Living Green Walls Improve a Space

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Living green walls, vertical gardens and biophilic designs offer all the benefits of nature inside a space that not only functions as living art but also improves our well-being.

Architecture and design firm Stantec recently completed the interior design of Wix’s new office and technical center located in Miami Beach. The 24,000 square foot office features a living wall made of green moss that displays the Wix logo while enhancing workers’ lives through a connection with nature. The indoor green wall increases the oxygen level throughout the office, reduces stress and enhances creativity and clarity of thought.

A tropical modern home, designed by Choeff Levy Fischman Architecture + Design, blurs the line between interior and exterior. The house, located on Allison Island, opens out onto an atrium with two 24-foot living walls. The living walls not only bring life to the modern architecture, but they also improve the house’s thermal insulation by adding a protective layer of plants.

Patrick Blanc, a French botanist and scientist, created the living wall at Juvia restaurant in South Beach, as well as the gardens at the Pérez Art Museum. Juvia’s wall not only regulates the rate of humidity outdoors, but it also cools the air. As the human footprint expands, these qualities are important. Unlike a green wall, which faces in one direction, Blanc used different types of plants on the hanging columns to create the vertical garden at Pérez Art Museum. The vertical garden restores the habitats of countless species while providing a space-efficient way of incorporating greenery into a building’s exterior design.

17 West Mixed-Use Development in Miami Beach Tops Off

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Architecture and design firm Stantec, Grycon, Turnberry Associates and Elion Partners celebrated the topping off of the five-story 17 West mixed-use development, which includes residences and Miami’s second Trader Joe’s grocery store. Located on 17th Street between Alton Road and West Avenue in Miami Beach, the 185,388 square foot project will include 23 residential units, a rooftop pool deck with a gym, ground level commercial space and a public garage with 193 parking spaces. The residential units range from one bedroom to three bedrooms. The project is scheduled for completion in January 2019.

OBR’s Favorite Miami Buildings

Though Miami is known for its pastel-colored hotels on South Beach, its architecture is defined by a number of contrasting styles. Architects and developers have been transforming Miami’s cityscape into one of the new architectural capitals of America. From a contemporary luxury high-rise to a historical Spanish hotel, we’ve curated a list of our top 5 most iconic buildings.

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The Biltmore Hotel

The Biltmore Hotel was built in 1926 by hotel magnate John McEntee Bowman and land developer George Merrick, who combined his deep affection for lush South Florida landscape with a high regard for Italian, Moorish and Spanish architectural influences to create this architectural gem. The Biltmore Hotel was initially the tallest building in Florida at 315 feet and, today, its 23,000 square-foot pool is one of the largest hotel pools in the continental United States. The Biltmore’s rich history makes it Coral Gables’ most preeminent historic landmark.

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1111 Lincoln

The iconic garage on the west end of Lincoln Road was designed by world-renowned architects Herzog & de Meuron. The open-air structure rises seven stories and includes office space, retail, parking spaces and a mysterious rooftop penthouse. The seventh floor of the garage is also where 1111 Vibe hosts Skywave Yoga on Monday evenings. The view from the top overlooks Lincoln Road, Alton Road and as far as the shores of Biscayne Bay.

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Solitair Brickell

Solitair Brickell, the latest luxury high-rise gracing Miami’s skyline, was recently completed by global architecture and design firm Stantec. The design of the 50-story building distinguishes itself with a unique angular, towering basket-weave design inspired by the majestic Medjool date palm tree popular in South Florida’s tropical landscape. Developed by ZOM Living, Solitair Brickell includes 483 residential units, millennial-friendly amenities and one of the highest rooftop resort-style pools in Miami.

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New World Center

The New World Center is a concert hall in the heart of South Beach, home to the New World Symphony, a post-graduate orchestral academy. A collaboration between the symphony’s artistic director, 11-time Grammy award-winning conductor, Michael Tilson Thomas, and Pritzker Prize-winning architect Frank Gehry, the building features multiple flexible spaces, cutting-edge media equipment, six stories of natural light and views of the iconic Miami Beach Art Deco skyline. A new 2.5-acre public park designed by the firm West 8, features the New World Center’s SoundScape park where New World Symphony WALLCAST concerts are presented on the building’s 7,000-square-foot projection wall.

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One Thousand Museum

One Thousand Museum is a high-rise residential condominium under construction in Downtown Miami designed by the late Pritzker Prize-winning architect Zaha Hadid. When completed, the 62-story building is expected to rise over 700 feet, making it one of the tallest buildings in Miami. The design of the building distinguishes itself with the contrast between the robust exoskeleton and the crystalline glazing of the glass façade beneath it. Gregg Covin, Todd Michael Glaser, Louis Birdman, Kevin Venger, Gilberto Bomeny and Regalia Group are the developers.